Summer Reading Reviews!

Check out what patrons are reading for the Summer Reading Program and what they think about their books!


 

9.)

Q1: Title

The History of Cape Elizabeth and Portland Head Light

Q2: Author

Mr. Williams’s Third Grade class 1992-93

Q3: Recommend this title to a friend?
  • Yes
Q4: Challenge Level:
  • Mild
Q5: My thoughts:

educational and a fun read from our Maine room! Illustrations were done by the children (now adults) in Mr. William’s third grade class of 1992-93. Love the historical account!


8.)

Q1: Title

Faithful Place

Q2: Author

Tana French

Q3: Recommend this title to a friend?
  • Yes
Q4: Challenge Level:
  • Medium
Q5: My thoughts:

As unrelentingly downbeat as the rest of French’s novels, yet so well-written that it demands to be read.


7.)

Q1: Title

Last Orders at Harrods

Q2: Author

Michael Holman

Q3: Recommend this title to a friend?
  • Yes
Q4: Challenge Level:
  • Mild
Q5: My thoughts:

Offers an alternate view of the symbiotic relationship between NGOs and repressive regimes.


6.)

Q1: Title

Pigeon English

Q2: Author

Stephen Kelman

Q3: Recommend this title to a friend?
  • Yes
Q4: Challenge Level:
  • Mild
Q5: My thoughts:

An all-too-familiar story told in a unique way that makes it magical. 


5.)

Q1: Title

The Storied Life of AJ Fikry

Q2: Author

Gabrielle Zevin

Q3: Recommend this title to a friend?
  • Yes
Q4: Challenge Level:
  • Mild
Q5: My thoughts:

Very enjoyable!


4.)

Q1: Title

The Shell Collector

Q2: Author

Anthony Doerr

Q3: Recommend this title to a friend?
  • Yes
Q4: Challenge Level:
  • Mild
Q5: My thoughts:

Beautiful book, beautifully written. Each story is different from the first, but equally as enchanting. Would read again and again.


3.)

Q1: Title

A Tale for the Time Being

Q2: Author

Ruth Ozeki

Q3: Recommend this title to a friend?
  • Yes
Q4: Challenge Level:
  • Extreme!
Q5: My thoughts:

If you’re looking for a page-turning beach read, this is not the book for you. If you are ready to tackle a lyrical meditation on time, space, nature, humanity, technology, religion and history, give this a try.


2.)

Q1: Title

The Dead in their Vaulted Arches

Q2: Author

Alan Bradley

Q3: Recommend this title to a friend?
  • Yes
Q4: Challenge Level:
  • Mild
Q5: My thoughts:

I would recommend it because I love the Flavia de Luce series, but this one takes a strange turn, which makes me wonder if I will want to keep reading them. I’m wondering what other fans of the series think of it.


1.)

Q1: Title

Want Not

Q2: Author

Jonathan Miles

Q3: Recommend this title to a friend?
  • Yes
Q4: Challenge Level:
  • Mild
Q5: My thoughts:

Funny, sad, and elegantly written–this book explores some neat (and relevant!) ideas about waste and desire in in the lives of its contemporary, American characters.

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May Hot Picks

Hot New Picks

for MAY

 

Nonfiction

Eating Dangerously: Why the government can’t keep your food safe…and how you can, by Michael Booth, et al. – Doesn’t just scare you silly; also provides practical tips for protecting yourself.

10% Happier: how I tamed the voice in my head, reduced stress without losing my edge, and found self-help…, by Dan Harris – Former local newsman and current Nightline anchor describes his journey to self-help after an on-air panic attack.

Five Came Back: A Story of Hollywood and the Second World War by Mark Harris – Discusses 5 Directors: Portland native John Ford, William Wyler, John Huston, Frank Capra, and George Stevens.

The Homing Instinct: Meaning & Mystery in Animal Migration, by Bernd Heinrich – Part-time Mainer writes of the relationship between the homing instinct and the human attachment to place.

Long Mile Home: Boston Under Attack, the City’s Courageous Recovery, and the Epic Hunt for Justice, by Scott Helman – Recounts the Marathon bombing and the search for the perpetrators.

We Animals, by Jo-Anne McArthur – Photojournalist illuminates our treatment of animals.

Sylvia Plath Drawings, by Sylvia Plath – Evocative drawings created during Plath’s travels with Ted Hughes, with an introduction by their daughter.

Life Is a Wheel: Love, Death, Etc., and a Bike Ride Across America, by Bruce Weber – First-person account of a 57-year-old’s solo journey across the country.

 

Fiction

The Hired Man, by Aminatta Forna – Maine Readers’ Choice Award Committee 2014 shortlisted-novel set in Croatia.

The Silkworm, by Robert Galbraith – Second in the mystery series for adults written pseudonymously by J. K. Rowling of Harry Potter fame.

Ancillary Justice, by Ann Leckie – Artificial intelligence that formerly controlled a starship is left with just one human body and a focus on revenge.

In Paradise, by Peter Matthiessen – Last novel by the award-winning author, set in a 1996 spiritual retreat at Auschwitz.

Raising Steam, by Terry Pratchett – Fortieth in the popular humorous science fiction “Discworld” series.

Murder at Cape Three Points, by Kwei Quartey – Third in “Darko Dawson” series set in Ghana.

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New Video Games!

TML has picked up some of the best video games of the generation to add to our growing collection. Get your holds in early, because these titles will go fast!

To check out our full video game selection in the database, click here!

 

Mass Effect – XBox 360

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Mass Effect 2 – XBox 360

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Mass Effect 3 – XBox 360

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Minecraft – XBox 360

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Rayman Legends – PS3

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Ni No Kuni – PS3

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April Hot New Picks!

Hot New Picks

for APRIL

 

A Philosophy of Walking, by Frederic Gros – French best-seller discusses great thinkers who walked.

One Simple Idea: How Positive Thinking Reshaped Modern Life, by Mitch Horowitz – Not a self-help book, but a history of the belief in the effectiveness of positive thinking.

Joy, Guilt, Anger, Love: What Neuroscience Can–And Can’t–Tell Us about How We Feel, by Giovanni Frazzetto – Engaging exploration of the nature of 7 different strong emotions.

Thanks for the Feedback, by Douglas Stone – Practical advice on gleaning positive results from feedback, no matter how negative or unfair.

Things I’ve Learned from Dying: A Book about Life, by David R. Dow – Dow writes as both a lawyer who defends death-row inmates, and a husband who loses his father-in-law to cancer.

The Thing with Feathers: The Surprising Lives of Birds and What They Reveal about Being Human, by Noah Strycker – An ornithologist, author of Among Penguins, discussed the weird and wonderful behavior of birds.

Why We Make Things and Why It Matters: The Education of a Craftsman, by Peter Korn – Maine resident and founder of the Center for Furniture Craftsmanship explores the satisfaction and sustenance that comes with creation.

Where Nobody Knows Your Name: Life in the Minor Leagues of Baseball, by John Feinstein – Follows 6 players, 2 managers, and one umpire through the dreams and dashed hopes of the 2012 AAA baseball season.

Fukushima: The Story of a Nuclear Disaster, by David Lochbaum et al. – Chebeague Island resident and co-author Susan Stranahan will be appearing at the library on April 17.

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March Hot New Picks!

books

Adult

Radiance of Tomorrow by Ishmael Beah – Fiction showing the effects of war in Sierra Leone by the author of the child soldier’s memoir “A Long Way Gone.”

Nets by Jen Bervin – Evocative poems created by highlighting words within the sonnets of William Shakespeare.

Under the Wide and Starry Sky by Nancy Horan – Fictional account of the wife of Robert Louis Stevenson by the author of Loving Frank.

You Should Have Known by Jean Hanff Korelitz – A Manhattan relationships expert confronts increasing unease with her own settled life. By the author of “Admission.”

The Weight of Blood by Laura McHugh – An Ozark teen is haunted by the long-ago disappearance of her mother, and the recent disappearance of a friend.

All Our Names by Dinaw Mengestu – A story of revolution and love, immigration and home, written by an acclaimed young author.

Thirty Girls by Susan Minot – The stories of an exploited Ugandan teenaged girl and an American journalist whose lives intertwine. Written by a part-time Mainer.

The Orchard of Lost Souls by Nadifa Mohamed – The lives of three very different women intersect in 1987 Somalia.

Bark by Lorrie Moore – The latest short story collection from a master of the form.

Boy, Snow, Bird by Helen Oyeyemi – A re-telling of the Snow White story, set in suburban Massachusetts.

The Accident by Christopher Pavone – Spy thriller with a literary agent as protagonist. Written by the author of “The Expats.”

The Divorce Papers by Susan Rieger – The story of a messy divorce told entirely through letters, emails, legal documents, and news articles.

The Spinning Heart by Donal Ryan – With each chapter told from a different point of view, residents of a small town react to their country’s financial collapse.

Young Adult

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey Chronicles II: Creatures & Characters by Daniel Falconer – A visual guide to the beings who inhabit the world of the hobbit.

The Other Way Around by Sashi Kaufman – Written by a Scarborough middle school teacher, the story of a runaway teen and the vagabond trash-pickers who take him in.

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Breaking Out of the Library Mold, in Boston and Beyond

The New York Times has written up an article about Boston Public Library’s current major renovation project. Despite an increasingly prevalent attitude that libraries are becoming relics of a bygone era, the numbers are showing the opposite nation-wide: just at BPL last year, the number of physical visits went up to 1.72 million–a rise of nearly half a million from 2012.

Read More!

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Hot New Picks!

Check out what’s new and popular at TML, and get your holds in early!

ADULT

Nonfiction

  • The Second Machine Age: Work, Progress, and Prosperity in a Time of Brilliant Technologies by Erik Brynjolfsson. A book that details the impact of digital technologies on our everyday lives.
  • Glitter and Glue by Kelly Corrigan. The author of The Middle Place explores her relationship with her mother.
  • Pigs Can’t Swim: A Memoir by Helen Peppe. A family story of growing up on a chaotic Maine farm, told with humor and compassion.
  • Miracles and Massacres: True and Untold Stories of the Making of America by Glenn Beck. American history dramatized and popularized through the eyes of media personality Glenn Beck.


Fiction

  • The Undead Pool by Kim Harrison. The latest in the vampire fantasy romance series, Hollows.
  • Astor Place Vintage by Stephanie Lehmann. The owner of a vintage clothing store finds a diary written by a woman living in Manhattan in 1907.
  • The Wives of Los Alamos by Tarashea Nesbit. Stories about the wives of the scientists who worked on the making of the atomic bomb.
  • The Resistance Man: A Bruno, Chief of Police Mystery by Martin Walker. The latest in the series of mysteries centered around a provincial French town, its gastronomic delights, and its resourceful Chief of Police.

YOUNG ADULT

Nonfiction

  • The Great American Dust Bowl by Don Brown. The story of a dark chapter in American history, told in graphic novel form.
  • The Divergent Companion: The Unauthorized Guide to the Series by Lois H. Gresh. Unauthorized exploration of the imaginary world created in the trilogy by Veronica Roth which is about to be released as a movie.


Fiction

  • Tsarina by J. Nelle Patrick. An adventurous fantasy romance set in the time of the last Czar and his family, Rasputin, and the Russian Revolution.
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